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How not Blogging for 1 Year Didn’t effect my Social Influence*

Photo: courtesy of CoxAndForkum.com

It’s been 1 year, 1 month and 1 day from my last post and my experiment is over. My experiment first started as a simple time management issue, I didn’t make time to write on 9/10/09 or 9/11/09, which would have been a great to write and pay tribute to the day that changed the world  forever, or the following day, month, and now a year.

However within the first week, I thought to myself if the common convention today is write a blog consistently and have instant Social Influence, I wanted to see if I didn’t blog consistently what would happen.

If I didn’t “blog” 300 words per post on a 3 day per week schedule would I somehow be less of a Social Media Maven.

The short answer is Yes however the long (tail) answer is No.

Yes blogging is probably one of the easiest ways to get recognized for what your passionate about, chronicle your expertise and build an online following.  As your following grows you essentially become the community manager of your personal brand.

The essence of a blog is this:

  1. You write, ideally contributing something of value to your reader(s),
  2. The reader(s) in turn subscribes to your ideas and spread the word to others
  3. Over time, the more you contribute valuable ideas to your readers the more they start transitioning from just readers to a community
  4. The more you encourage and get feedback i.e. comments / tweets / retweets / facebook likes / etc the more active your community becomes and the more you become a community manager
  5. Lastly the more the community becomes passionate about your ideas and community you have created the more influential you, the blogger, become

Now granted this is an extremely high level perspective of the essence of Blogging but the point is consistently blog valuable information to a growing number of people and become influential socially or is that socially influential?

According to the social encyclopedia, wikipedia Social Influence is quite simply “when an individual’s thoughts, feelings or actions are affected by other people.”

So in theory is that the more people “subscribe” to your ideas the more Socially Influential you become.

Now that is the short answer, however the long answer is that there are many ways to contribute and share ideas, blogging just makes it scalable on a world wide level.

I believe in the do what you do best and outsource the rest philosophy.  And instead of blogging for a global audience, I focused on developing my online social influence by focusing on my offline influence locally, here in Boston.

In last weeks Inbound Marketing Summit there was a lot of buzz around this concept of Offline affecting Online. The relationships you establish offline definitely affects your relationships online.

And even though I didn’t blog consistently I was still able to contribute to the Social Media ecosystem and accomplish my goals.

Here are just a few highlights of my non-blogging one year experiment.

If I was able to accomplish/ contribute these things without a blog, think of what you can accomplish. So forget about yesterday and what you didn’t do and focus on the future and what you can do. If you haven’t done what you set out to do last year, setup a plan to accomplish it this year, whether it’s blogging, writing a book, going to more offline events like tweetups, etc.

I choose to grow my online influence by focusing on my offline activities.  On average I support/attend 2-3 offline tweetups/events in Boston area a night

Now that my one year experiment is over, you will see more contributions from me here on my blog on a more consistent basis.

What do you think? Do you need to blog everyday or 3 times a week to develop/grow your social influence? If not, what other ways can you  grow your Social influence?

{ 7 comments… add one }

  • Amanda @ BuzzFarmers.com October 10, 2010, 6:03 pm

    Great post Joselin. I think you’re a master at word-of-mouth marketing and don’t require to blog every day to spread your influence. Everyone knows you from your videos and seeing you in person, which, I think, in terms of influence… makes you more influential than someone who spends more time behind a computer instead of getting out there and making real-world connections.

    Agree with you on the long tail though. Having an arsenal of knowledge and content can somehow prove that you’re “practicing what you’re preaching”, but it all depends on who you’re trying to influence I suppose!

  • JoselinMane October 10, 2010, 6:14 pm

    Thanks for the feedback Amanda.

    Yes Content is only King if it resonants to their kingdom (readers) ;-)

  • Lois Ardito October 11, 2010, 1:57 pm

    Hi Joselin,

    I think that no “written” words can be as influential and well received as your weekly Boston Tweet-Up post. You may not write, but you do vlog and that has proven to be very successful for you and your SM presence.

    Lois

  • JoselinMane October 11, 2010, 2:00 pm

    Lois,

    Thanks for the comment. Yes I agree and it was a worthwhile experiment and your right I did actually blog but just not here. ;-)

  • Roy Rodenstein November 12, 2010, 3:03 pm

    Great contrarian post/experiment, Joselin.

    My only comment would be that I think Influence is an aggregate measure, and you can primer the pump for example by starting out with heavy blog+twitter focus, then once you get know a bit cut back on some areas and focus on others.

    I think if someone never did any blogging in the first place it would be harder, although as you say not impossible because active twitter, offline etc. work can be almost as good (maybe offline work a bit harder to link to, but…)

  • JoselinMane November 13, 2010, 11:28 pm

    Roy,

    Thanks for the feedback. Yes influence is a based on a summary of work as about to one post, tweet, or comment.

    And yes if one has no history contributing to any community its extremely difficult to develop any influence.

    Thanks and talk to you soon.

  • Anon October 5, 2011, 10:45 am

    You only have 2 blog posts before your experiment began. How can not blogging on an empty blog prove anything?

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